“In 2006, researchers in Italy showed the specifics of how Cannabidiol (CBD) kills cancer. When CBD pairs with the cancer cell receptor CB-2 it stimulates what is known as the Caspase Cascade, that kills the cancer cell. First, let’s look at the nomenclature, then to how Caspase kills cancer. Caspase in an aggregate term for all cysteine-aspartic proteases. The protease part of this term comes from prote (from protein) and -ase (destroyer). Thus the caspases break down proteins and peptides in the moribund cell. This becomes obvious when we see caspase-3 referred to as the executioner. In the pathway of apoptosis, other caspases are brought in to complete the cascade.9

Even when the cascade is done and all the cancer is gone, CBD is still at work healing the body. Its pairing at CB-2 also shuts down the Id-1 gene; a gene that allows metastatic lesions to form. Fundamentally this means that treatment with cannabinoids not only kills cancer through numerous simultaneous pathways, but prevents metastasis. What’s not to like. One researcher says this: CBD represents the first nontoxic exogenous agent that can significantly decrease Id-1 expression in metastatic carcinoma leading to the down-regulation of tumor aggressiveness.10”

Patients for Medical Cannabis

This article was recently mentioned in the Metro Times Detroit

See also:

How Cannabinoids Kill Cancer – Dennis Hill

Update from Dennis (2.28.13):

  • My progress is good. Asked my doctor the meaning of my last three PSAs. He said: The PSA has not risen over 2.4 in nine months, we can presume the cancer is in remission. Music to my ears. Cannabinoid extract wins again. Huzzah!

Previous update (12.8.12):

  • After six months using cannabis extract, a prostate biopsy confirmed the cancer was gone, in February 2010. Twenty months later, biopsy showed cancer had returned. I have reinstated cannabis extract and PSA is declining. I expect the cancer to be gone soon, just as it did previously.

On the need to decarboxylate medicine: 

  • “My co-op hash oil had not been decarboxylated. THCA does not fit the CB-1 receptor that is required to send seramide to the work of apoptosis.” (This…

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